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Posts Tagged ‘Wilczek

Physics in 100 Years

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susyFrank Wilczek
Here I indulge in wide-ranging speculations on the shape of physics, and technology closely related to physics, over the next one hundred years.
Themes include the many faces of unification, the re-imagining of quantum theory, and new forms of engineering on small, intermediate, and large scales.
Read more at http://arxiv.org/pdf/1503.07735.pdf

Written by physicsgg

March 27, 2015 at 8:01 pm

Perpetual Motion Test Could Amend Theory of Time

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Sketch of ion ring. An illustration of the time crystal experiment planned at UC-Berkeley. Electric fields will be used to corral calcium ions into a 100-micron-wide “trap,” where they will form a crystalline ring. The scientists believe a static magnetic field will cause the ring to rotate. (Illustration: Courtesy of Hartmut Häffner)

Sketch of ion ring.
An illustration of the time crystal experiment planned at UC-Berkeley. Electric fields will be used to corral calcium ions into a 100-micron-wide “trap,” where they will form a crystalline ring. The scientists believe a static magnetic field will cause the ring to rotate. (Illustration: Courtesy of Hartmut Häffner)

by: Natalie Wolchover
In February 2012, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Frank Wilczek decided to go public with a strange and, he worried, somewhat embarrassing idea. Impossible as it seemed, Wilczek had developed an apparent proof of “time crystals” — physical structures that move in a repeating pattern, like minute hands rounding clocks, without expending energy or ever winding down. Unlike clocks or any other known objects, time crystals derive their movement not from stored energy but from a break in the symmetry of time, enabling a special form of perpetual motion.

“Most research in physics is continuations of things that have gone before,” said Wilczek, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This, he said, was “kind of outside the box.”

Wilczek’s idea met with a muted response from physicists. Here was a brilliant professor known for developing exotic theories that later entered the mainstream, including the existence of particles called axions and anyons, and discovering a property of nuclear forces known as asymptotic freedom (for which he shared the Nobel Prize in physics in 2004). But perpetual motion, deemed impossible by the fundamental laws of physics, was hard to swallow. Did the work constitute a major breakthrough or faulty logic? Jakub Zakrzewski, a professor of physics and head of atomic optics at Jagiellonian University in Poland who wrote a perspective on the research that accompanied Wilczek’s publication, says: “I simply don’t know.”

Now, a technological advance has made it possible for physicists to test the idea. They plan to build a time crystal, not in the hope that this perpetuum mobile will generate an endless supply of energy (as inventors have striven in vain to do for more than a thousand years) but that it will yield a better theory of time itself….
Read more at https://simonsfoundation.org/features/science-news/perpetual-motion-test-could-amend-theory-of-time/

Written by physicsgg

April 27, 2013 at 6:33 am

Posted in PHYSICS

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