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Posts Tagged ‘Transistors

A Matterwave Transistor Oscillator

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The atomtronic transistor

Seth C. Caliga, Cameron J. E. Straatsma, Alex A. Zozulya, Dana Z. Anderson
A triple-well atomtronic transistor combined with forced RF evaporation is used to realize a driven matterwave oscillator circuit. The transistor is implemented using a metalized compound glass and silicon substrate. On-chip and external currents produce a cigar-shaped magnetic trap, which is divided into transistor source, gate, and drain regions by a pair of blue-detuned optical barriers projected onto the magnetic trap through a chip window. A resonant laser beam illuminating the drain portion of the atomtronic transistor couples atoms emitted by the gate to the vacuum. The circuit operates by loading the source with cold atoms and utilizing forced evaporation as a power supply that produces a positive chemical potential in the source, which subsequently drives oscillation. High-resolution in-trap absorption imagery reveals gate atoms that have tunneled from the source and establishes that the circuit emits a nominally mono-energetic matterwave with a frequency of 23.5(1.0) kHz by tunneling from the gate, corresponding to a vacuum energy of 2.67 MHz x h, where h is Planck’s constant, and a vacuum wavelength of 29 nm. Time-of-flight measurements indicate that the transistor exhibits ohmic cooling, i.e. negative resistance, and therefore has gain. Time-of-flight measurements are also used to determine an upper bound of the atomtronic transresistance, r<0.01 Hz/Hz x h/m^2 where m is the mass of rubidium 87, and that the closed-loop circuit energy gain varies between 3.1 and 3.6.
Read more: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1208.3109v1.pdf

Read also: First Atomtronic Radio Broadcasts Matter Waves

Written by physicsgg

August 20, 2012 at 3:20 pm

Posted in ATOMIC PHYSICS

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Single atom transistor gets precise position on chip

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A voltage applied across the electrodes induces a current in the perpendicular electrodes, with the phosphorus atom making it all possible

In a remarkable feat of micro-engineering, UNSW physicists have created a working transistor consisting of a single atom placed precisely in a silicon crystal.


http://youtu.be/ue4z9lB5ZHg

Read more here

Written by physicsgg

February 19, 2012 at 8:01 pm

Posted in ATOMIC PHYSICS, TECHNOLOGY

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Transistors are made from natural cotton fibers

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Smarter, more functional clothing incorporating electronics may be possible in the near future, according to a study co-authored by Cornell fiber scientist Juan Hinestroza.

This organic electrochemical transistor was made with cotton fibers. The gate, drain and source in the device are made from cotton threads with conductive or semiconductive behavior induced by using nanoparticle-based coatings

Hinestroza, associate professor of fiber science, was part of an international team that developed transistors using natural cotton fibers.
“Creating transistors from cotton fibers brings a new perspective to the seamless integration of electronics and textiles, enabling the creation of wearable electronic devices,” Hinestroza said.
The innovation represents a significant step forward because it lays the groundwork for creating even more complex devices, such as cotton-based circuits, Hinestroza said.
This would allow fabrics to sense body temperature, automatically heat up or cool down, or track heart rate or blood pressure in high-risk patients, as well as to monitor physical effort of high-performance athletes.
“Perhaps one day we can even build computers out of cotton fibers in a similar way as khipus — a recording device based on knots and used by the Inca empire in Peru,” Hinestroza added.
The research is published online Sept. 13 in Organic Electronics. It describes a new technique in which conformal coatings — which are those that follow cotton’s irregular topography — of gold nanoparticles along with semiconductive and conductive polymers were used to tailor the electronic behavior of natural cotton fibers.
Cotton was chosen as a substrate because of its mechanical and inherent comfort properties, relative cheapness and widespread use in fabric and clothing. Cotton fibers are lightweight and sustainable.

In the study, the first step was aimed at creating a conformal layer of nanoparticles over the rough topography of cotton. The next layers were either conductive or semiconductive coatings; the final step was to build the devices. “The layers were so thin that the flexibility of the cotton fibers was preserved,” Hinestroza said.

Two kinds of active transistors, organic electrochemical transistors and organic field effect transistors, were also demonstrated. Both kinds are widely used in the electronics industry as components of integrated circuits, which control the functions of such common devices as phones, televisions and game consoles.

The study represented an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort between fiber scientists from Cornell, physicists from the University of Bologna and electrical engineers from the University of Cagliari, both in Italy, and materials scientists from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Étienne in France.
Hinestroza’s lab contributed expertise in fibers and fiber functionality, and the other researchers led with their expertise in physics, electrical engineering and organic electronics.

The first author of the paper, Giorgio Mattana of the University of Cagliari, was at Cornell as an international visiting student for two semesters in 2009-10 working in Hinestroza’s and another lab on campus. He also used the facilities of the Cornell Nanofabrication Facility and Cornell Center for Materials Research.
Provided by Cornell University – physorg.com

Written by physicsgg

October 27, 2011 at 1:15 pm

Posted in TECHNOLOGY

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