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Posts Tagged ‘LHC

Physics restarts in the LHC at new record energy

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The LHC has started proton collisions at the unprecedent energy of 4 TeV per beam. This video celebrates the new milestone and explains the physics challenges and ecxpectations for the two larger experiments ATLAS and CMS through the words of the current physics coordinators Richard Hawkings and Greg Landsberg.

cdsweb.cern.ch
Read more: cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1435792

Written by physicsgg

April 5, 2012 at 12:31 pm

Posted in High Energy Physics

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LHC energy boost will aid hunt for Higgs boson

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Two teams at the LHC have seen hints of what may well prove to be the Higgs

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will increase the energies of the bunches of subatomic particles called protons that it smashes together.

The boost should improve the collider’s chances of discovering “new physics” and definitively confirming or denying the existence of Higgs boson particle.

The proton beams’ energies will be increased by 14%, for a total collision energy of 8 trillion electron volts.

The announced increase will break the LHC’s own high-energy record.

Since first switching on in 2008, operators at the LHC have cautiously increased the energy contained in each of the bunches of protons sent around the 27km collider, while lies beneath the Franco-Swiss border.

The decision to turn up the energy when the collider switches on again later this year was taken at a conference about the LHC in Chamonix in France.

“When we started operating the LHC for physics in 2010, we chose the lowest safe beam energy consistent with the physics we wanted to do,” said Steve Myers, director for accelerators and technology at Cern, the laboratory that operates the LHC.

“Two good years of operational experience with beam and many additional measurements made during 2011 give us the confidence to safely move up a notch, and thereby extend the physics reach of the experiments before we go into the LHC’s first long shutdown.”

It is planned that the collider will collect data until November, after which it will be upgraded during a shutdown period that will last 20 months.

That should result in an operating proton beam energy of 14 trillion electronvolts, or teraelectronvolts – double the energy used to date.

The LHC collaboration hopes to reach that milestone in 2014, re-starting the hunt for “new physics” in early 2015.

In the 2012 run of experiments, the team hopes among other things to definitively confirm or rule out the existence of the Higgs boson, the particle hypothesised to be the origin of mass in the Universe.

In announcements made in December 2011, teams from the two major detectors at the facility announced they had seen hints of the particle but stopped short of claiming they had seen it with certainty.

Last week, the teams formally submitted their papersto academic journals for review by the scientific community.

While the data from the Atlas collaboration largely repeated what had been reported in December, the CMS collaboration’s analysis included new data in support of a Higgs boson with a mass about 132 times that of the proton, slightly lower than that reported by Atlas.

Researchers are still investigating the discrepancy, which may affect the degree of certainty that the Higgs has in fact been glimpsed.

What is certain is that more data to be taken in 2012 will settle the debate.

While the collider’s proton beam energies will be boosted by 14%, improvements in data handling and the ability to focus those proton beams mean that the machine’s “luminosity” – a measure of how intense and productive the collisions ultimately are – should lead to a three-fold increase in data it produces compared to 2011…..

Read more: bbc.co.uk

Written by physicsgg

February 14, 2012 at 1:51 pm

Posted in High Energy Physics

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Jon Butterworth – Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and the LHC

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Professor Jon Butterworth, member of the High Energy Physics group on the Atlas experiment, provides an overview of his work at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

Written by physicsgg

February 13, 2012 at 8:45 am

Posted in High Energy Physics

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What the latest LHC revelations say about the Higgs

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In December 2011, the elusive Higgs boson was back in the limelight when hints of the particle emerged in the wreckage of proton collisions at the world’s most powerful particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva, Switzerland.
There have been no new collisions since, but researchers from the LHC’s two main detectors have given the existing data a more careful look, culminating in two fresh Higgs analyses released on Tuesday….
Read more: newscientist.com

Written by physicsgg

February 9, 2012 at 7:36 pm

Posted in High Energy Physics

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Black Hole Remnants at the LHC

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L. Bellagamba, R. Casadio, R. Di Sipio, V. Viventi
We investigate possible signatures of black hole events at the LHC in the hypothesis that such objects will not evaporate completely, but leave a stable remnant.
For the purpose of defining a reference scenario, we have employed the publicly available Monte Carlo generator CHARYBDIS2, in which the remnant’s behavior is mostly determined by kinematic constraints and conservation of some quantum numbers, such as the baryon charge.
Our findings show that electrically neutral remnants are highly favored and a significantly larger amount of missing transverse momentum is to be expected with respect to the case of complete decay….
Read more: arxiv.org/pdf

Written by physicsgg

January 17, 2012 at 5:19 pm

Posted in High Energy Physics

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Searching for Higgs: from LEP towards LHC

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Estimate of the Higgs mass in the Standard Model from electroweak precision measurements (24). The excluded area labeled LHC has been updated with results from Ref.(51), courtesy M. Gr¨unewald. Present search limits for the Higgs boson from LEP and LHC leave only a small mass gap, the white bar close to the minimum of the χ^2 distribution

W.-D. Schlatter (CERN), P. M. Zerwas (DESY)
After a brief introduction to the theoretical basis of the Higgs mechanism for generating the masses of elementary particles, the experimental searches for Higgs particles will be summarized, from bounds at LEP to inferences for LHC.
The report will focus on the Standard Model, though some central results on extended Higgs systems, as conjectured for example in supersymmetric theories, will also be recapitulated.
Alternative scenarios based on spontaneous symmetry breaking by novel strong interactions are adumbrated at the theoretical level…..
Read more: arxiv.org/pdf

Written by physicsgg

December 23, 2011 at 1:42 pm

LHC reports discovery of its first new particle

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The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on the Franco-Swiss border has made its first clear observation of a new particle since opening in 2009.

Known as Chi-b (3P), it is a boson – the label given to particles that can carry the forces of nature.

The as-yet unpublished discovery isreported on the Arxiv pre-print server.

The LHC is exploring some of the fundamental questions in “big physics” by colliding proton particles together in a huge underground facility.

Detail in the sub-atomic wreckage from these impacts is expected to yield new information about the way matter is constructed.

The Chi-b (3P) is a more excited state of Chi particles already seen in previous collision experiments, explained Prof Roger Jones, who works on the Atlas detector at the LHC.

“The new particle is made up of a ‘beauty quark’ and a ‘beauty anti-quark’, which are then bound together,” he told BBC News.

“People have thought this more excited state should exist for years but nobody has managed to see it until now.

“It’s also interesting for what it tells us about the forces that hold the quark and the anti-quark together – the strong nuclear force. And that’s the same force that holds, for instance, the atomic nucleus together with its protons and the neutrons.”

The LHC is designed to fill in gaps in the Standard Model – the current framework devised to explain the interactions of sub-atomic particles – and also to look for any new physics beyond it.

In particular, it is using the collisions to try to pin down the famous Higgs particle – another boson that physicists hypothesize can explain why matter has mass.

Discoveries such as Chi-b (3P) are an important part of this quest because they add to the wider background knowledge, says Prof Jones.

“The better we understand the strong force, the more we understand a large part of the data that we see, which is quite often the background to the more exciting things we are looking for, like the Higgs.

“So, it’s helping put together that basic understanding that we have and need to do the new physics.”
www.bbc.co.uk

Read also: A New Particle at the LHC? Yes, But… and ATLAS Discovers New Chi_b Resonance

Written by physicsgg

December 22, 2011 at 1:19 pm

Posted in High Energy Physics

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Muppets at the Large Hadron Collider

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Written by physicsgg

November 23, 2011 at 5:50 pm

Posted in HUMOR

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