Analogy between thermal emission of nano objects and Hawking’s radiation

cavity
Karl Joulain
We analyze in this work some analogies between thermal emission of nano objects and Hawking’s radiation. We first focus on the famous expression of the black hole radiating temperature derived by Hawking in 1974 and consider the case of thermal emission of a small aperture made into a cavity (Ideal Blackbody). We show that an expression very similar to Hawking’s temperature determines a temperature below which an aperture in a cavity cannot be considered as standard blackbody radiating like T^4. Hawking’s radiation therefore appear as a radiation at a typical wavelength which is of the size of the horizon radius. In a second part, we make the analogy between the emission of particle-anti particle pairs near the black hole horizon and the scattering and coupling of thermally populated evanescent waves by a nano objects. We show here again that a temperature similar to the Hawking temperature determines the regimes where the scattering occur or where it is negligible.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1808.08037.pdf

The Hawking temperature, the uncertainty principle and quantum black holes

blackhole1

A static black hole. The horizon (H ) is at a distance RS from the singularity (S).

Jorge Pinochet
In 1974, Stephen Hawking theoretically discovered that black holes emit thermal radiation and have a characteristic temperature, known as the Hawking temperature. The aim of this paper is to present a simple heuristic derivation of the Hawking temperature, based on the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. The result obtained coincides exactly with Hawking’s original finding. In parallel, this work seeks to clarify the physical meaning of Hawking’s discovery. This article may be useful as pedagogical material in a high school physics course or in an introductory undergraduate physics course.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1808.05121.pdf

Has Hawking radiation been measured?

Experimental apparatus. The experimental apparatus used in our experiments: (1) flume, (2) intake reservoir, (3) obstacle, (4) wave generator, (5) adjustable weir, (6) holding reservoir, and (7) pump and pump valve. (S. Weinfurtner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 021302, 2011.)—Richard J. Fitzgerald http://arxiv.org/abs/1008.1911 )

Measurement of stimulated Hawking emission in an analogue system – Experimental apparatus (S. Weinfurtner et al. 
http://arxiv.org/abs/1008.1911 )

W.G. Unruh
It is argued that Hawking radiation has indeed been measured and shown to posses a thermal spectrum, as predicted.
This contention is based on three separate legs. The first is that the essential physics of the Hawking process for black holes can be modelled in other physical systems.
The second is the white hole horizons are the time inverse of black hole horizons, and thus the physics of both is the same. The third is that the quantum emission, which is the Hawking process, is completely determined by measurements of the classical parameters of a linear physical system.
The experiment conducted in 2010 fulfills all of these requirements, and is thus a true measurement of Hawking radiation….
… Read more at http://arxiv.org/pdf/1401.6612v1.pdf