Who discovered positron annihilation?

Positron annihilatioTim Dunker
In the early 1930s, the positron, pair production, and, at last, positron annihilation were discovered. Over the years, several scientists have been credited with the discovery of the annihilation radiation. Commonly, Thibaud and Joliot have received credit for the discovery of positron annihilation. A conversation between Werner Heisenberg and Theodor Heiting prompted me to examine relevant publications, when these were submitted and published, and how experimental results were interpreted in the relevant articles. I argue that it was Theodor Heiting – usually not mentioned at all in relevant publications – who discovered positron annihilation, and that he should receive proper credit.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1809.04815.pdf

Introduction to neutrino astronomy

neutrino flux

Energy dependence of the neutrino fluxes produced by the different nuclear processes in the Sun

Andrea Gallo Rosso, Carlo Mascaretti, Andrea Palladino, Francesco Vissani
This writeup is an introduction to neutrino astronomy, addressed to astronomers and written by astroparticle physicists. While the focus is on achievements and goals in neutrino astronomy, rather than on the aspects connected to particle physics, we will introduce the particle physics concepts needed to appreciate those aspects that depend on the peculiarity of the neutrinos. The detailed layout is as follows: In Sect.~1, we introduce the neutrinos, examine their interactions, and present neutrino detectors and telescopes. In Sect.~2, we discuss solar neutrinos, that have been detected and are matter of intense (theoretical and experimental) studies. In Sect.~3, we focus on supernova neutrinos, that inform us on a very dramatic astrophysical event and can tell us a lot on the phenomenon of gravitational collapse. In Sect.~4, we discuss the highest energy neutrinos, a very recent and lively research field. In Sect.~5, we review the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations and assess its relevance for neutrino astronomy. Finally, we offer a brief overall assessment and a summary in Sect.~6. The material is selected – i.e., not all achievements are reviewed – and furthermore it is kept to an introductory level, but efforts are made to highlight current research issues. In order to help the beginner, we prefer to limit the list of references, opting whenever possible for review works and books.

Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1806.06339.pdf

A short walk through the physics of neutron stars

A schematic cross section of a neutron star illustrating the various regions discussed in the text. The different regions shown are not drawn on scale.

Isaac Vidana
In this work we shortly review several aspects of the physics of neutron stars. After the introduction we present a brief historical overview of the idea of neutron stars as well as of the theoretical and observational developments that followed it from the mid 1930s to the present. Then, we review few aspects of their observation discussing, in particular, the different types of telescopes that are used, the many astrophysical manifestations of these objects, and several observables such as masses, radii or gravitational waves. Finally, we briefly summarize some of theoretical issues like their composition, structure equations, equation of state, and neutrino emission and cooling.
read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1805.00837.pdf

Applications of Nuclear Physics

Anna C. Hayes
Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion.
The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos.
The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article onto itself, which is not the intention of the current review. Rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.
read more at https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1701/1701.02756.pdf