Applications of Nuclear Physics

Anna C. Hayes
Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion.
The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos.
The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article onto itself, which is not the intention of the current review. Rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.
read more at https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1701/1701.02756.pdf

Accelerator on a Chip

Could tiny chips no bigger than grains of rice do the job of a huge particle accelerator? At full potential, a series of these “accelerators on a chip” could boost electrons to the same high energies achieved in SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory’s 2-mile linear accelerator in a distance of just 100 feet. This could make accelerators a lot smaller and more affordable.

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has awarded $13.5 million to an international collaboration led by Stanford University, to develop a working prototype of such an accelerator over the next five years. SLAC and two other national labs provide key in-kind contributions in support of this expansive university effort.

Here’s how “accelerator on a chip” works: Electrons enter the chip and travel through a microscopic tunnel that has tiny ridges carved into its walls. When scientists shine an infrared laser on the chip, the light interacts with those ridges and produces an electrical field that boosts the energy of the passing electrons. In experiments at SLAC, the chip achieved an acceleration gradient, or energy boost over a given distance, roughly 10 times higher than the SLAC linear accelerator can provide.

There’s a lot of work to do to make this technology practical for real-world use. For instance, creating a full-fledged tabletop accelerator will require a more compact way to get electrons up to speed before they enter the chip; the Moore Foundation’s funding will help scientists work on that, and ideally create a prototype the size of a shoebox.

On the plus side, the accelerator on a chip uses commercial lasers and can be manufactured with low-cost, mass-production techniques.

Scientists think a series of these tiny chips could greatly reduce the size and cost of particle accelerators for a variety of applications. For example, the technology could help make compact low-cost accelerators and X-ray devices for security scanning, medicine, biology and materials science. Small, portable X-ray sources could improve medical care for people injured in combat and reduce the cost of medical imaging in hospitals.

Read more at http://energy.gov/articles/accelerator-chip

The puzzle of the origin of elements in the Universe

A rare nuclear reaction that occurs in red giants has been observed for the first time at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy. This result was achieved by the LUNA experiment, the world’s only accelerator facility running deep underground.

The LUNA experiment at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy has observed a rare nuclear reaction that occurs in giant red stars, a type of star in which our sun will also evolve. This is the first direct observation of sodium production in these stars, one of the nuclear reactions that is fundamental for the formation of the elements that make up the universe. The study has been published in Physical Review Letters.

LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) is a compact linear accelerator. It is the only one in the world installed in an underground facility, shielded against cosmic rays. The experiment aims to study the nuclear reactions that take place inside stars where, like in an intriguing and amazing cosmic kitchen, the elements that make up matter are formed and then driven out by gigantic explosions and scattered as cosmic dust.

For the first time, this experiment has observed three “resonances” in the neon-sodium cycle responsible for sodium production in red giants and energy generation (the 22Ne(p,g)23Na. In the same way as in acoustics, a “resonance” is a particular condition that makes the reaction inside the star extremely likely. LUNA recreates the energy ranges of nuclear reactions and, with its accelerator, goes back in time to one hundred million years after the Big Bang, to the formation of the first stars and the start of those processes that gave rise to mysteries we still do not fully understand, such as the huge variety in the quantities of the elements in the universe.

“This result is an important piece in the puzzle of the origin of the elements in the universe, which the experiment has been studying for the last 25 years”, remarked Paolo Prati, spokesperson for the LUNA experiment. “Stars generate energy and at the same time assemble atoms through a complex system of nuclear reactions. A very small number of these reactions have been studied in the conditions under which they occur inside stars, and a large proportion of those few cases have been observed with this accelerator”.

LUNA uses a compact linear accelerator in which hydrogen and helium beams are accelerated and made to collide with a target (in this case, a neon isotope), to produce other particles. Special detectors obtain images of the products of the collisions and identify the reaction to be examined. These extremely rare processes can only be detected in conditions of cosmic silence. The rock surrounding the underground facility at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory shields the experiment against cosmic rays and protects its measurements.

LUNA is an international collaboration involving some 50 Italian, German, Scottish and Hungarian researchers from the National Institute for Nuclear Physics in Italy, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf in Germany, the MTA-ATOMKI in Hungary and the School of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Edinburgh in the UK.

Read more at www.lngs.infn.it and journals.aps.org (Three New Low-Energy Resonances in the 22Ne(p,g)23Na Reaction)