physics4me

physicsgg

Archive for the ‘History and Philosophy of Physics’ Category

The quest for the proton charge radius

leave a comment »

A slight anomaly in optical spectra of the hydrogen atom led Willis E. Lamb to the search for the proton size. As a result, he found the shift of the 2S1/2 level, the first experimental demonstration of quantum electrodynamics. In return, a modern test of QED yielded a new value of the charge radius of the proton. This sounds like Baron Muenchausens tale: to pull oneself out from the marsh by seizing his own hair. An independent method was necessary. Muonic hydrogen spectroscopy came to the aid. However, the high-precision result significantly differed from the previous, electronic, values: this is the proton radius puzzle. This puzzle produced a decade-long activity both in experimental work and in theory. Even if the puzzle seems to be solved, the precise determination of the proton charge radius requires further efforts in the future.

Read more at

Click to access 2103.17101v1.pdf

Written by physicsgg

April 2, 2021 at 8:11 am

An Analysis of the Concept of Inertial Frame

leave a comment »

The concept of inertial frame of reference is analysed. It has been shown that this fundamental concept of physics is not clear enough. A definition of inertial frame of reference is proposed which expresses its key inherent property. The definition is operational and powerful. Many other properties of inertial frames follow from the definition or it makes them plausible. In particular, the definition shows why physical laws obey space and time symmetries and the principle of relativity, it resolves the problem of clock synchronization and the role of light in it, as well as the problem of the geometry of inertial frames.
Read more at

Click to access 2103.15570.pdf

Written by physicsgg

March 31, 2021 at 8:56 am

The Quantum Field Theory on Which the Everyday World Supervenes

leave a comment »

Limits on a new fifth force, in terms of its strength relative to gravity, as a function of its range. Adapted from data collected in (Adelberger et al., 2009). This is a rough reconstruction; see original source for details.

Sean M. Carroll
Effective Field Theory (EFT) is the successful paradigm underlying modern theoretical physics, including the “Core Theory” of the Standard Model of particle physics plus Einstein’s general relativity. I will argue that EFT grants us a unique insight: each EFT model comes with a built-in specification of its domain of applicability. Hence, once a model is tested within some domain (of energies and interaction strengths), we can be confident that it will continue to be accurate within that domain. Currently, the Core Theory has been tested in regimes that include all of the energy scales relevant to the physics of everyday life (biology, chemistry, technology, etc.). Therefore, we have reason to be confident that the laws of physics underlying the phenomena of everyday life are completely known.
Read nore at

Click to access 2101.07884.pdf

Written by physicsgg

January 23, 2021 at 10:45 am

The Timeline Of Gravity

leave a comment »

Arshia Anjum, Sriman Srisa Saran Mishra
Gravity plays an important part in the experiments and discoveries of the modern world. But how was it discovered? Surely Newton and Einstein were not the only people to observe it and account for it. It had been a long path before the full theory for Gravitation could be formulated with open ends for more add-ons and modifications. All the contributions from across the world and different eras helped in the discovery of gravity as a whole new concept and area of research with a major contribution from the Greeks. This 3 article series lists out the important curves in the carefully carved path of gravitational discovery. The first article summarises the development of interest in the cosmos and the growth of scientific knowledge through ancient theories and observations.
Read more at

Click to access 2011.14014.pdf

Written by physicsgg

December 3, 2020 at 9:06 am

The thermodynamics of clocks

leave a comment »


G J Milburn
All clocks, classical or quantum, are open non equilibrium irreversible systems subject to the constraints of thermodynamics. Using examples I show that these constraints necessarily limit the performance of clocks and that good clocks require large energy dissipation. For periodic clocks, operating on a limit cycle, this is a consequence of phase diffusion. It is also true for non periodic clocks (for example, radio carbon dating) but due to telegraph noise not to phase diffusion. In this case a key role is played by accurate measurements that decrease entropy, thereby raising the free energy of the clock, and requires access to a low entropy reservoir. In the quantum case, for which thermal noise is replaced by quantum noise (spontaneous emission or tunnelling), measurement plays an essential role for both periodic and non periodic clocks. The paper concludes with a discussion of the Tolman relations and Rovelli’s thermal time hypothesis in terms of clock thermodynamics.
Read more at

Click to access 2007.02217.pdf

Written by physicsgg

September 16, 2020 at 12:03 pm

The subtle sound of quantum jumps

leave a comment »

Antoine Tilloy
Could we hear the pop of a wave-function collapse, and if so, what would it sound like? There exist reconstructions or modifications of quantum mechanics (collapse models) where this archetypal signature of randomness exists and can in principle be witnessed. But, perhaps surprisingly, the resulting sound is disappointingly banal, indistinguishable from any other click. The problem of finding the right description of the world between two completely different classes of models — where wave functions jump and where they do not — is empirically undecidable. Behind this seemingly trivial observation lie deep lessons about the rigidity of quantum mechanics, the difficulty to blame unpredictability on intrinsic randomness, and more generally the physical limitations to our knowledge of reality.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.15420

Click to access 2007.15420.pdf

Written by physicsgg

July 31, 2020 at 7:52 am

James Chadwick: ahead of his time

leave a comment »

Gerhard Ecker
James Chadwick is known for his discovery of the neutron. Many of his earlier findings and ideas in the context of weak and strong nuclear forces are much less known. This biographical sketch attempts to highlight the achievements of a scientist who paved the way for contemporary subatomic physics.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.06926

Click to access 2007.06926.pdf


 

Written by physicsgg

July 16, 2020 at 9:33 pm

Physics and the Pythagorean Theorem

leave a comment »

James Overduin, Richard Conn Henry
Pythagoras’ theorem lies at the heart of physics as well as mathematics, yet its historical origins are obscure. We highlight a purely pictorial, gestalt-like proof that may have originated during the Zhou Dynasty. Generalizations of the Pythagorean theorem to three, four and more dimensions undergird fundamental laws including the energy-momentum relation of particle physics and the field equations of general relativity, and may hint at future unified theories. The intuitive, “pre-mathematical” nature of this theorem thus lends support to the Eddingtonian view that “the stuff of the world is mind-stuff.”
Read more https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.10671

Click to access 2005.10671.pdf

Written by physicsgg

May 25, 2020 at 7:26 am