FASER’s new detector expected to catch first collider neutrino

The first-of-its-kind detector could initiate a new era in neutrino physics at particle colliders

Illustration of the FASER experiment. The new FASERν detector, which is just 25 cm wide, 25 cm tall and 1.35 m long, will be located at the front of FASER’s main detector in a narrow trench (yellow block in the bottom right of the image). (Image: FASER/CERN)

No neutrino produced at a particle collider has ever been detected, even though colliders create them in huge numbers. This could now change with the approval of a new detector for the FASER experiment at CERN. The small and inexpensive detector, called FASERν, will be placed at the front of the FASER experiment’s main detector, and could launch a new era in neutrino physics at particle colliders.

Ever since they were first observed at a nuclear reactor in 1956, neutrinos have been detected from many sources, such as the sun, cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere, and the Earth, yet never at a particle collider. That’s unfortunate, because most collider neutrinos are produced at very high energies, at which neutrino interactions have not been well studied. Neutrinos produced at colliders could therefore shed new light on neutrinos, which remain the most enigmatic of the fundamental particles that make up matter.

The main reasons why collider neutrinos haven’t been detected are that, firstly, neutrinos interact very weakly with other matter and, secondly, collider detectors miss them. The highest-energy collider neutrinos, which are more likely to interact with the detector material, are mostly produced along the beamline – the line travelled by particle beams in a collider. However, typical collider detectors have holes along the beamline to let the beams through, so they can’t detect these neutrinos.

Enter FASER, which was approved earlier this year to search for light and weakly interacting particles such as dark photons – hypothetical particles that could mediate an unknown force that would link visible matter with dark matter. FASER, supported by the Heising-Simons and Simons Foundations, will be located along the beamline of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), about 480 metres downstream of the ATLAS experiment, so it will be ideally positioned to detect neutrinos. However, the detection can’t be done with the experiment’s main detector.

“Since neutrinos interact very weakly with matter, you need a target with a lot of material in it to successfully detect them. The main FASER detector doesn’t have such a target, and is therefore unable to detect neutrinos, despite the huge number that will traverse the detector from the LHC collisions,” explains Jamie Boyd, co-spokesperson for the FASER experiment. “This is where FASERν comes in. It is made up of emulsion films and tungsten plates, and acts both as the target and the detector to see the neutrino interactions.”

FASERν is only 25 cm wide, 25 cm tall and 1.35 m long, but weighs 1.2 tonnes. Current neutrino detectors are generally much bigger, for example Super-Kamiokande, an underground neutrino detector in Japan, weighs 50 000 tonnes, and the IceCube detector in the South Pole has a volume of a cubic kilometre.

After studying FASER’s ability to detect neutrinos and doing preliminary studies using pilot detectors in 2018, the FASER collaboration estimated that FASERν could detect more than 20 000 neutrinos. These neutrinos would have a mean energy of between 600 GeV and 1 TeV, depending on the type of neutrino produced. Indeed there are three types of neutrinos – electron neutrino, muon neutrino and tau neutrino – and the collaboration expects to detect 1300 electron neutrinos, 20 000 muon neutrinos and 20 tau neutrinos.

“These neutrinos will have the highest energies yet of man-made neutrinos, and their detection and study at the LHC will be a milestone in particle physics, allowing researchers to make highly complementary measurements in neutrino physics,” says Boyd. “What’s more, FASERν may also pave the way for neutrino programmes at future colliders, and the results of these programmes could feed into discussions of proposals for much larger neutrino detectors.”

The FASERν detector will be installed before the next LHC run, which will start in 2021, and it will collect data throughout this run.

https://home.cern/news/news/physics/fasers-new-detector-expected-catch-first-collider-neutrino

FCC-ee: Your Questions Answered

This document answers in simple terms many FAQs about FCC-ee, including comparisons with other colliders. It complements the FCC-ee CDR and the FCC Physics CDR by addressing many questions from non-experts and clarifying issues raised during the European Strategy symposium in Granada, with a view to informing discussions in the period between now and the final endorsement by the CERN Council in 2020 of the European Strategy Group recommendations. This document will be regularly updated as more questions appear or new information becomes available.

Baseline FCC tunnel layout with a perimeter of 97.5 km, and ptimized placement in the Geneva basin, showing the main topographical and geological features.

Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1906.02693.pdf

On Future High-Energy Colliders

Gian Francesco Giudice
While the LHC physics programme is still in full swing, the preparations for the European Strategy for Particle Physics and the recent release of the FCC Conceptual Design Report bring attention to the future of high-energy physics. How do results from the LHC impact the future of particle physics? Why are new high-energy colliders needed?
Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1902.07964.pdf

After primordial inflation

D. V. Nanopoulos, K. A. Olive, M. Srednicki
We consider the history of the early universe in the locally supersymmetric model we have previously discussed. We pay particular attention to the requirement of converting the quanta of the field which drives primordial inflation (inflatons) to ordinary particles which can produce the cosmological baryon asymmetry without producing too many gravitinos. An inflaton mass of about 1013 GeV (a natural value in our model) produces a completely acceptable scenario.
Read more at https://lib-extopc.kek.jp/preprints/PDF/1983/8305/8305219.pdf

Black Hole as Extreme Particle Accelerator

Life of the jet set. This simulation follows along in a “co-moving” reference frame with a fixed set of particles as they are blasted out of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The magnetic field lines they experience change as they move from a smoother region (left) to a region with a kink instability (right).  [Credit: E. P. Alves et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2018)]

Efficient Nonthermal Particle Acceleration by the Kink Instability in Relativistic Jets

E. Paulo Alves, Jonathan Zrake, Frederico Fiuza
Relativistic magnetized jets from active galaxies are among the most powerful cosmic accelerators, but their particle acceleration mechanisms remain a mystery. We present a new acceleration mechanism associated with the development of the helical kink instability in relativistic jets, which leads to the efficient conversion of the jet’s magnetic energy into nonthermal particles. Large-scale three-dimensional ab initio simulations reveal that the formation of highly tangled magnetic fields and a large-scale inductive electric field throughout the kink-unstable region promotes rapid energization of the particles. The energy distribution of the accelerated particles develops a well-defined power-law tail extending to the radiation-reaction limited energy in the case of leptons, and to the confinement energy of the jet in the case of ions. When applied to the conditions of well-studied bright knots in jets from active galaxies, this mechanism can account for the spectrum of synchrotron and inverse Compton radiating particles, and offers a viable means of accelerating ultra-high-energy cosmic rays to 1020 eV.

Read more at https://physics.aps.org/articles/v11/130 and https://arxiv.org/pdf/1810.05154.pdf

Simulating quantum field theory with a quantum computer

John Preskill
Forthcoming exascale digital computers will further advance our knowledge of quantum chromodynamics, but formidable challenges will remain. In particular, Euclidean Monte Carlo methods are not well suited for studying real-time evolution in hadronic collisions, or the properties of hadronic matter at nonzero temperature and chemical potential. Digital computers may never be able to achieve accurate simulations of such phenomena in QCD and other strongly-coupled field theories; quantum computers will do so eventually, though I’m not sure when. Progress toward quantum simulation of quantum field theory will require the collaborative efforts of quantumists and field theorists, and though the physics payoff may still be far away, it’s worthwhile to get started now. Today’s research can hasten the arrival of a new era in which quantum simulation fuels rapid progress in fundamental physics.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1811.10085.pdf

Who discovered positron annihilation?

Positron annihilatioTim Dunker
In the early 1930s, the positron, pair production, and, at last, positron annihilation were discovered. Over the years, several scientists have been credited with the discovery of the annihilation radiation. Commonly, Thibaud and Joliot have received credit for the discovery of positron annihilation. A conversation between Werner Heisenberg and Theodor Heiting prompted me to examine relevant publications, when these were submitted and published, and how experimental results were interpreted in the relevant articles. I argue that it was Theodor Heiting – usually not mentioned at all in relevant publications – who discovered positron annihilation, and that he should receive proper credit.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1809.04815.pdf