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Archive for the ‘High Energy Physics’ Category

Steven Weinberg in conversation with Andrew Strominger

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Steven Weinberg is a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin. His research on elementary particle physics and cosmology has been honored with the Nobel Prize in Physics, the National Medal of Science, the Benjamin Franklin Medal of the American Philosophical Society, the Dannie Heinemann Prize for Mathematical Physics, and numerous other awards. He has written over 300 scientific articles, and six treatises on general relativity, quantum field theory, cosmology, and quantum mechanics. Among his books for general readers are Dreams of a Final Theory and The First Three Minutes, and two collections of published essays, Facing Up: Science and its Cultural Adversaries, and Lake Views: This World and the Universe.

Andrew Strominger is the Gwill E. York Professor of Physics at Harvard University and a founding member of the Black Hole Initiative. He is a renowned theoretical physicist who has made pathbreaking contributions to classical and quantum gravity, quantum field theory and string theory. In recognition of his accomplishments, Strominger has been awarded the prestigious 2017 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, the 2016 Dannie Heineman Prize from the American Physical Society, and numerous other honors.

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April 6, 2021 at 11:50 am

Why is AI hard and Physics simple?

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We discuss why AI is hard and why physics is simple. We discuss how physical intuition and the approach of theoretical physics can be brought to bear on the field of artificial intelligence and specifically machine learning. We suggest that the underlying project of machine learning and the underlying project of physics are strongly coupled through the principle of sparsity, and we call upon theoretical physicists to work on AI as physicists. As a first step in that direction, we discuss an upcoming book on the principles of deep learning theory that attempts to realize this approach…. Read more at

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April 2, 2021 at 12:11 pm

James D. Bjorken:“Why Do We Do Physics? Because Physics Is Fun!”

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In this informal memoir, the author describes his passage through a golden age of elementary particle physics. It includes not only his career trajectory as a theoretical physicist but also his excursions into experimental physics and particle accelerator theory. While his successes are highlighted, some unsuccessful efforts are included in the narrative as well. Those “losers” were arguably as pleasurable as the less-frequent “winners.” Since retirement, the author has become interested in gravitation theory and cosmology—a new golden age. This activity is also briefly described ….. Read more at: https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev-nucl-101918-023359

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March 30, 2021 at 3:14 pm

Edward Witten: How Do Scientific Breakthroughs Happen?

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March 16, 2021 at 4:32 pm

Posted in High Energy Physics

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Antimatter and other deep mysteries

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Public lecture by Dr. Gerald Gabrielse
Our universe is made of matter. Yet the Big Bang produced essentially equal amounts of matter and antimatter according to our most fundamental understanding of the building blocks of nature. The inability of our fundamental theory to describe this basic feature of our universe is the great frustration of modern physics. In this one-hour lecture, held on Feb. 19, 2021, Dr. Gerald Gabrielse, Northwestern University, gives an introduction to antimatter and matter, explains the theoretical framework that explains particle interactions, and gives examples of attempts to solve the mystery of antimatter.

Dr. Gerald Gabrielse, a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of the Arts and Sciences, is a Trustees Professor at Northwestern University. His vision, techniques and measurements started low-energy antiproton and antihydrogen research at the European laboratory CERN. He has made the most precise measurement of a property of an elementary particle, the electron’s magnet, to test the Standard Model’s most precise prediction. His test of whether the electron charge is spherical is one of the most sensitive tests for physics beyond the Standard Model.

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March 13, 2021 at 3:31 pm

Open Questions at the Physics Frontier with Steven Weinberg

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March 11, 2021 at 3:11 pm

Posted in High Energy Physics

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Elementary Particles: What are they? Substances, elements and primary matter

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D-M. Cabaret, T. Grandou, G-M. Grange, E. Perrier
The most successful “Standard Model” allows one to define the so-called “Elementary Particles”. Now from another point of view, philosophical, how can we think of them? Which kind of a status can be attributed to Elementary Particles and their associated quantised fields? Beyond the unprecedented efficiency and reach of quantum field theories the current paper attempts at understanding the nature of what we talk about, the enigmatic reality of the quantum world.
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Click to access 2103.05522.pdf

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March 10, 2021 at 8:33 pm

What are Elementary Particles?

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Wolfgang Bietenholz
We describe the very nature of the elementary particles, which our (visible) Universe consists of. We point out that they are not point-like, and we depict their ways of interacting. We also address puzzles that occur even in the absence of particles, in the vacuum.
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Click to access 2011.07719.pdf

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February 5, 2021 at 6:20 pm