Echoes from the Abyss

Evidence for Planck-scale structure at black hole horizons
Jahed Abedi, Hannah Dykaar, Niayesh Afshordi

echoes-1030x708In classical General Relativity (GR), an observer falling into an astrophysical black hole is not expected to experience anything dramatic as she crosses the event horizon. However, tentative resolutions to problems in quantum gravity, such as the cosmological constant problem, or the black hole information paradox, invoke significant departures from classicality in the vicinity of the horizon. It was recently pointed out that such near-horizon structures can lead to late-time echoes in the black hole merger gravitational wave signals that are otherwise indistinguishable from GR. We search for observational signatures of these echoes in the gravitational wave data released by advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), following the three black hole merger events GW150914, GW151226, and LVT151012. In particular, we look for repeating damped echoes with time-delays of 8MlogM (+spin corrections, in Planck units), corresponding to Planck-scale departures from GR near their respective horizons. Accounting for the “look elsewhere” effect due to uncertainty in the echo template, we find tentative evidence for Planck-scale structure near black hole horizons at 2.9σ significance level (corresponding to false detection probability of 1 in 270). Future data releases from LIGO collaboration, along with more physical echo templates, will definitively confirm (or rule out) this finding, providing possible empirical evidence for alternatives to classical black holes, such as in firewall or fuzzball paradigms.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1612.00266v1.pdf

Read also https://briankoberlein.com/2016/12/03/echoes-from-the-abyss/

Emergent Gravity and the Dark Universe

new_theory_of_gravity_954x716Recent theoretical progress indicates that spacetime and gravity emerge \break together from the entanglement structure of an underlying microscopic theory. These~ideas are best understood in Anti-de Sitter space, where they rely~on~the area law for entanglement entropy. The extension to de Sitter space requires taking into account the entropy and temperature associated with the cosmological horizon. Using insights from string theory, black hole physics and quantum information theory we argue that the positive dark energy leads to a thermal volume law contribution to the entropy that overtakes the area law precisely at the cosmological horizon. Due to the competition between area and volume law entanglement the microscopic de Sitter states do not thermalise at sub-Hubble scales: they exhibit memory effects in the form of an entropy displacement caused by matter. The emergent laws of gravity contain an additional `dark’ gravitational force describing the `elastic’ response due to the entropy displacement.
We derive an estimate of the strength of this extra force in terms of the baryonic mass, Newton’s constant and the Hubble acceleration scale α0=cH0, and provide evidence for the fact that this additional `dark gravity~force’ explains the observed phenomena in galaxies and clusters currently attributed to dark~matter.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1611.02269v1.pdf

Read also: New theory of gravity might explain dark matter

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Cosmic Neutrinos Detected, Confirming The Big Bang’s Last Great Prediction

The fit of the number of neutrino species required to match the CMB fluctuation data. Image credit: Brent Follin, Lloyd Knox, Marius Millea, and Zhen PanPhys. Rev. Lett. 115, 091301 — Published 26 August 2015.

The fit of the number of neutrino species required to match the CMB fluctuation data. Image credit: Brent Follin, Lloyd Knox, Marius Millea, and Zhen PanPhys. Rev. Lett. 115, 091301 — Published 26 August 2015.

(…) Last year, a paper by Brent Follin, Lloyd Knox, Marius Millea and Zhen Pan came out, detecting this phase shift for the first time. From the publicly-available Planck (2013) data, they were able to not only definitively detect it, they were able to use that data to confirm that there are three types of neutrinos — the electron, muon and tau species — in the Universe: no more, no less.

The number of neutrino species as inferred by the CMB fluctuation data. Image credit: Brent Follin, Lloyd Knox, Marius Millea, and Zhen PanPhys. Rev. Lett. 115, 091301 — Published 26 August 2015.

The number of neutrino species as inferred by the CMB fluctuation data. Image credit: Brent Follin, Lloyd Knox, Marius Millea, and Zhen PanPhys. Rev. Lett. 115, 091301 — Published 26 August 2015.

What’s incredible about this is that there is a phase shift seen, and that when the Planck polarization spectra came out and become publicly available, they not only constrained the phase shift even further, but — as announced by Planck scientists in the aftermath of this year’s AAS meeting — they finally allowed us to determine what the temperature is of this Cosmic Neutrino Background today! (Or what it would be, if neutrinos were massless.) The result? 1.96 K, with an uncertainty of less than ±0.02 K. This neutrino background is definitely there; the fluctuation data tells us this must be so. It definitely has the effects we know it must have; this phase shift is a brand new find, detected for the very first time in 2015. Combined with everything else we know, we have enough to state that yes, there are three relic neutrino species left over from the Big Bang, with the kinetic energy that’s exactly in line with what the Big Bang predicts.(…)

Read more at http://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2016/09/09/cosmic-neutrinos-detected-confirming-the-big-bangs-last-great-prediction/#66a2193b4be4

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How supernovae became the basis of observational cosmology

Supernova classification

Supernova classification

Maria Victorovna Pruzhinskaya, Sergey Mikhailovich Lisakov
This paper is dedicated to the discovery of one of the most important relationships in supernova cosmology – the relation between the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae and their luminosity decline rate after maximum light.
The history of this relationship is quite long and interesting. The relationship was independently discovered by the American statistician and astronomer Bert Woodard Rust and the Soviet astronomer Yury Pavlovich Pskovskii in the 1970s.
Using a limited sample of Type I supernovae they were able to show that the brighter the supernova is, the slower its luminosity declines after maximum.
Only with the appearance of CCD cameras could Mark Phillips re-inspect this relationship on a new level of accuracy using a better sample of supernovae. His investigations confirmed the idea proposed earlier by Rust and Pskovskii.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1608/1608.04192.pdf