Foundations of quantum physics

II. The thermal interpretation

Arnold Neumaier
This paper presents the thermal interpretation of quantum physics. The insight from Part I of this series that Born’s rule has its limitations – hence cannot be the foundation of quantum physics – opens the way for an alternative interpretation – the thermal interpretation of quantum physics. It gives new foundations that connect quantum physics (including quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, quantum field theory and their applications) to experiment.

Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1902.10779.pdf

Read also: Foundations of quantum physics III. Measurement

On Future High-Energy Colliders

Gian Francesco Giudice
While the LHC physics programme is still in full swing, the preparations for the European Strategy for Particle Physics and the recent release of the FCC Conceptual Design Report bring attention to the future of high-energy physics. How do results from the LHC impact the future of particle physics? Why are new high-energy colliders needed?
Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1902.07964.pdf

Is The Starry Night Turbulent?

The Starry Night
Vincent van Gogh (1889)


James Beattie, Neco Kriel
Vincent van Gogh’s painting, The Starry Night, is an iconic piece of art and cultural history. The painting portrays a night sky full of stars, with eddies (spirals) both large and small. Kolmogorov1941’s description of subsonic, incompressible turbulence gives a model for turbulence that involves eddies interacting on many length scales, and so the question has been asked: is The Starry Night turbulent? To answer this question, we calculate the azimuthally averaged power spectrum of a square region (1165×1165 pixels) of night sky in The Starry Night. We find a power spectrum, P(k), where k is the wavevector, that shares the same features as supersonic turbulence. It has a power-law P(k)∝k2.1±0.3 in the scaling range, 34≤k≤80. We identify a driving scale, kD=3, dissipation scale, kν=220 and a bottleneck. This leads us to believe that van Gogh’s depiction of the starry night closely resembles the turbulence found in real molecular clouds, the birthplace of stars in the Universe.

Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1902.03381.pdf

Lost in Math?

Lost in Math? A review of ‘Lost in Math: How Beauty Leads Physics Astray’, by Sabine Hossenfelder

Jeremy Butterfield
This is a review of Hossenfelder’s book, ‘Lost in Math: How Beauty Leads Physics Astray’. The book gives a breezy exposition of the present situation in fundamental physics, and raises important questions: both about the content of the physics, and the way physics research is organized. I first state my main disagreements. Then, I mostly praise the book: I concentrate on Hossenfelder’s discussion of supersymmetry, naturalness and the multiverse.
Read more at https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1902/1902.03480.pdf