Nanocurrent oscillator indefinitely powered by a capacitor battery

Layout of the experimental apparatus. (Legend: PCTC, PID controlled thermostatic chamber; R, reed relays; Osc, oscillator; CB, capacitor battery; PTS, temperature sensor to control the PID device; MTS, sensor to measure the temperature inside the chamber; 1, outputs to the acquisition board; 2; outputs to the acquisition board and PID controller.)

Layout of the experimental apparatus. 
(Legend: PCTC, PID controlled thermostatic chamber; R, reed relays; Osc, oscillator; CB, capacitor battery; PTS, temperature sensor to control the PID device; MTS, sensor to measure the temperature inside the chamber; 1, outputs to the acquisition board; 2; outputs to the acquisition board and PID controller.)

Luigi Ragni
Some electrolytic capacitors show dielectric behaviour that can not be entirely explained by the well known long lasting relaxation. Extra charges able to generate a useful conduction current can be detected for an indefinite time. A squarewave oscillator based on MOSFET CMOS technology and requiring less than 2 nW was powered for 80 days at 25 {\deg}C by a 58.2 mF capacitor battery, without voltage decrease during the last 53 days of observation. The battery consisted of three series of 16 parallel, 15 years aged, capacitors with DC capacitance of 10.9 mF. Capacitors so old, stored without voltage application, were affected by degradation and thinning of the alumina layer that could promote tunnelling of the charge. The main purpose of the present study is to stimulate further investigations aimed at confirming or disputing the observed phenomenon and, if necessary, at shedding light on its physical mechanisms.
(…..)
IV. CONCLUSIONS
A 58 mF electrolytic capacitor battery appeared able to supply a 1.8 nW squarewave oscillator for 80 days at 25◦C, after being fully discharged, and a usable amount of charge reemerged without any applied external source. From the 53rd day the voltage remained roughly constant if not weakly increasing. The assembled battery consisted of a series of three branches, each of which formed by 16 parallel capacitors. The capacitors used were aged about 15 years without current application: a condition sufficient to degrade and make the alumina dielectric layer thin. The present experiment seems to confirm the results of a previous study carried out with 3.3 mF electrolytic capacitors loaded with a resistor and stored at the same temperature. On the basis of this evidence it seems possible to indefinitely power a device in the framework of an apparent violation of the second law of thermodynamics. Before jumping to erroneous, rejectable conclusions some considerations have to be made. We do not know what is the prevalent physical mechanism involved in this behaviour; we can only speculate that it could be due to, or at least influenced by the following phenomena: charge tunnelling due to the reduced thickness in the alumina layer and associated with permanent embedding of charges in the layer; thermoelectric or thermionic effects within temperature oscillations of a few tenths of Celsius degree; chemical reactions; background radiation. Again, we can not say anything about the evolution of the present experiment, other than that it can be observed (for some time) at the webpage http://oscillator.polocesena.unibo.it/oscillator.html.
On the other hand we think that this phenomenon deserves attention. In primis, we hope that the experiment will be replicated by independent laboratories, better if in more severe test conditions, such as with temperature variations in the order of 1/100 of Celsius degree and with background radiation shielding.

Read more: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1211.6735v1.pdf

One thought on “Nanocurrent oscillator indefinitely powered by a capacitor battery

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.