What hadron collider is required to discover or falsify natural supersymmetry?

Howard Baer, Vernon Barger, James S. Gainer, Peisi Huang, Michael Savoy, Hasan Serce, Xerxes Tata
Weak scale supersymmetry (SUSY) remains a compelling extension of the Standard Model because it stabilizes the quantum corrections to the Higgs and W, Z boson masses. In natural SUSY models these corrections are, by definition, never much larger than the corresponding masses. Natural SUSY models all have an upper limit on the gluino mass, too high to lead to observable signals even at the high luminosity LHC. However, in models with gaugino mass unification, the wino is sufficiently light that supersymmetry discovery is possible in other channels over the entire natural SUSY parameter space with no worse than 3% fine-tuning. Here, we examine the SUSY reach in more general models with and without gaugino mass unification (specifically, natural generalized mirage mediation), and show that the high energy LHC (HE-LHC), a pp collider with \sqrt{s}=33 TeV, will be able to detect the gluino signal over the entire allowed mass range. Thus, HE-LHC would either discover or conclusively falsify natural SUSY.

Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1702.06588.pdf

Qbe: Quark Matter on Rubik’s Cube

Figure of Albert Einstein, the smile of Mona Lisa and Qbe: Quark Matter on Rubik’s 3x3 Cube, next to the Road to Reality: A Complete Guide to the Laws of the Universe. Photo courtesy of prof. T. Kodama, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Figure of Albert Einstein, the smile of Mona Lisa and Qbe: Quark
Matter on Rubik’s 3×3 Cube, next to the Road to Reality: A Complete Guide to the
Laws of the Universe. Photo courtesy of prof. T. Kodama, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

T. Csörgő
Quarks can be represented on the faces of the 3×3 Rubik’s cube with the help of a symbolic representation of quarks and anti-quarks, that was
delevoped originally for a deck of elementary particle cards, called Quark Matter Card Game. Cubing the cards leads to a model of the nearly perfect
fluid of Quark Matter on Rubik’s cube, or Qbe, which can be utilized to provide hands-on experience with the high entropy density, overall color
neutrality and net baryon free, nearly perfect fluid nature of Quark Matter.

Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1702.06217.pdf

Applications of Nuclear Physics

Anna C. Hayes
Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion.
The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos.
The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article onto itself, which is not the intention of the current review. Rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.
read more at https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1701/1701.02756.pdf