Aside

“What’s (the) Matter?”

A Show on Elementary Particle Physics with 28 Demonstration Experiments
Herbi K. Dreiner et al
We present the screenplay of a physics show on particle physics, by the Physikshow of Bonn University. The show is addressed at non-physicists aged 14+ and communicates basic concepts of elementary particle physics including the discovery of the Higgs boson in an entertaining fashion. It is also demonstrates a successful outreach activity heavily relying on the university physics students. This paper is addressed at anybody interested in particle physics and/or show physics. This paper is also addressed at fellow physicists working in outreach, maybe the experiments and our choice of simple explanations will be helpful. Furthermore, we are very interested in related activities elsewhere, in particular also demonstration experiments relevant to particle physics, as often little of this work is published.
Our show involves 28 live demonstration experiments. These are presented in an extensive appendix, including photos and technical details. The show is set up as a quest, where 2 students from Bonn with the aid of a caretaker travel back in time to understand the fundamental nature of matter. They visit Rutherford and Geiger in Manchester around 1911, who recount their famous experiment on the nucleus and show how particle detectors work. They travel forward in time to meet Lawrence at Berkeley around 1950, teaching them about the how and why of accelerators. Next, they visit Wu at DESY, Hamburg, around 1980, who explains the strong force. They end up in the LHC tunnel at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland in 2012. Two experimentalists tell them about colliders and our heroes watch live as the Higgs boson is produced and decays. The show was presented in English at Oxford University and University College London, as well as Padua University and ICTP Trieste. It was 1st performed in German at the Deutsche Museum, Bonn (5/’14). The show has eleven speaking parts and involves in total 20 people.
Read more at http://arxiv.org/pdf/1607.07478v1.pdf

Leonardo da Vinci’s studies of friction

Sketches from two different pages in Leonardo’s notebooks: (a, b) from Codex Atlanticus, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan (CA folio 532r c. 1506-8), and (c) from Codex Arundel, British Library, London (Arundel folio 41r c. 1500-05)

Sketches from two different pages in Leonardo’s notebooks: (a, b) from Codex
Atlanticus, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan (CA folio 532r c. 1506-8), and (c) from Codex Arundel, British Library, London (Arundel folio 41r c. 1500-05)

Ian M. Hutchings
Based on a detailed study of Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks, this review examines the development of his understanding of the laws of friction and their application. His work on friction originated in studies of the rotational resistance of axles and the mechanics of screw threads.
He pursued the topic for more than 20 years, incorporating his empirical knowledge of friction into models for several mechanical systems. Diagrams which have been assumed to represent his experimental apparatus are misleading, but his work was undoubtedly based on experimental measurements and probably largely involved lubricated contacts.
Although his work had no influence on the development of the subject over the succeeding centuries, Leonardo da Vinci holds a unique position as a pioneer in tribology.
Read more at http://www.ifm.eng.cam.ac.uk/uploads/Hutchings_Leonardo_Friction_2016_v2.pdf

Read also: Study reveals Leonardo da Vinci’s ‘irrelevant’ scribbles mark the spot where he first recorded the laws of friction

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The nature of polarized light using smartphones

malus
Martín Monteiro, Cecilia Stari, Cecilia Cabeza, Arturo C. Marti

Originally an empirical law, nowadays Malus’ is seen as a key experiment to demonstrate the traversal nature of electromagnetic waves, as well as the intrinsic connection between optics and electromagnetism. More specifically, it is an operational way to characterize a linear polarized electromagnetic wave. A simple and inexpensive setup is proposed in this work, to quantitatively verify the nature of polarized light. A flat computer screen serves as a source of linear polarized light and a smartphone is used as a measuring instrument thanks to its built-in sensors. The intensity of light is measured by means of the luminosity sensor with a tiny filter attached over it. The angle between the plane of polarization of the source and the filter is measured by means of the three-axis accelerometer, that works, in this case, as an incliometer. Taken advantage of the simultaneous use of these two sensors, a complete set of measures can be obtained just in a few seconds. The experimental light intensity as a function of the angle shows an excellent agreement with standard results…
…. Read more at https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1607/1607.02659.pdf