Ad Honorem Sir Andrew J. Wiles

wilesOn May 24, 2016, Sir Andrew J. Wiles received the Abel Prize in a ceremony held in the Aula of the University of Oslo in Oslo, Norway. Wiles, who received the prize from H.R.H. Crown Prince Haakon at the award ceremony, was the fourteenth recipient of the 6 million NOK (about 750,000 USD) prize. A prize honoring the Norwegian mathematician Niels Henrik Abel was first proposed by the world-renowned mathematician Sophus Lie, also from Norway, and initially planned for the one-hundredth anniversary of Abel’s birth in 1902, but the establishment of the Abel Prize had to wait another hundred years. The Abel Prize is administered by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters…
Read more at http://www.ams.org/publications/journals/notices/201703/rnoti-p197.pdf

What hadron collider is required to discover or falsify natural supersymmetry?

Howard Baer, Vernon Barger, James S. Gainer, Peisi Huang, Michael Savoy, Hasan Serce, Xerxes Tata
Weak scale supersymmetry (SUSY) remains a compelling extension of the Standard Model because it stabilizes the quantum corrections to the Higgs and W, Z boson masses. In natural SUSY models these corrections are, by definition, never much larger than the corresponding masses. Natural SUSY models all have an upper limit on the gluino mass, too high to lead to observable signals even at the high luminosity LHC. However, in models with gaugino mass unification, the wino is sufficiently light that supersymmetry discovery is possible in other channels over the entire natural SUSY parameter space with no worse than 3% fine-tuning. Here, we examine the SUSY reach in more general models with and without gaugino mass unification (specifically, natural generalized mirage mediation), and show that the high energy LHC (HE-LHC), a pp collider with \sqrt{s}=33 TeV, will be able to detect the gluino signal over the entire allowed mass range. Thus, HE-LHC would either discover or conclusively falsify natural SUSY.

Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1702.06588.pdf

Qbe: Quark Matter on Rubik’s Cube

Figure of Albert Einstein, the smile of Mona Lisa and Qbe: Quark Matter on Rubik’s 3x3 Cube, next to the Road to Reality: A Complete Guide to the Laws of the Universe. Photo courtesy of prof. T. Kodama, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Figure of Albert Einstein, the smile of Mona Lisa and Qbe: Quark
Matter on Rubik’s 3×3 Cube, next to the Road to Reality: A Complete Guide to the
Laws of the Universe. Photo courtesy of prof. T. Kodama, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

T. Csörgő
Quarks can be represented on the faces of the 3×3 Rubik’s cube with the help of a symbolic representation of quarks and anti-quarks, that was
delevoped originally for a deck of elementary particle cards, called Quark Matter Card Game. Cubing the cards leads to a model of the nearly perfect
fluid of Quark Matter on Rubik’s cube, or Qbe, which can be utilized to provide hands-on experience with the high entropy density, overall color
neutrality and net baryon free, nearly perfect fluid nature of Quark Matter.

Read more at https://arxiv.org/pdf/1702.06217.pdf