POLARBEAR seeks cosmic answers in microwave polarization

The Huan Tran Telescope in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The POLARBEAR microwave bolometers are mounted on the telescope to study the polarization of light from a period 380,000 years after the Big Bang. Credit: POLARBEAR consortium

The Huan Tran Telescope in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The POLARBEAR microwave bolometers are mounted on the telescope to study the polarization of light from a period 380,000 years after the Big Bang. Credit: POLARBEAR consortium

An international team of physicists has measured a subtle characteristic in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation that will allow them to map the large-scale structure of the universe, determine the masses of neutrinos and perhaps uncover some of the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy. Continue reading POLARBEAR seeks cosmic answers in microwave polarization

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Timelapse over Europe

This timelapse video shows two passes over Europe taken by ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst as he flew overhead on the International Space Station at around 400 km altitude.

The International Space Station travels at 28 800 km/h meaning that it only takes 90 minutes to circle Earth completely. Each orbit the Station moves around 2200 km to the West in relation to 90 minutes before.

Astronauts often use normal consumer digital cameras to take pictures of Earth through Europe’s observatory module Cupola in their spare time. Setting the camera to take an image every few seconds and then playing the images back quickly create this timelapse effect.

Alexander worked as a geophysicist and volcanologist before he was chosen as an ESA astronaut in 2009. His Blue Dot mission includes an extensive scientific programme of experiments in physical science, biology, and human physiology as well as radiation research and technology demonstrations. All experiments chosen make use of the out-of-this-world laboratory to improve life on Earth or prepare for further human exploration of our Solar System.

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Experimental Realization of Quantum Artificial Intelligence

quantum11Li Zhaokai, Liu Xiaomei, Xu Nanyang, Du jiangfeng
Machines are possible to have some artificial intelligence like human beings owing to particular algorithms or software.
Such machines could learn knowledge from what people taught them and do works according to the knowledge.
In practical learning cases, the data is often extremely complicated and large, thus classical learning machines often need huge computational resources. Quantum machine learning algorithm, on the other hand, could be exponentially faster than classical machines using quantum parallelism.
Here, we demonstrate a quantum machine learning algorithm on a four-qubit NMR test bench to solve an optical character recognition problem, also known as the handwriting recognition.
The quantum machine learns standard character fonts and then recognize handwritten characters from a set with two candidates.
To our best knowledge, this is the first artificial intelligence realized on a quantum processor.
Due to the widespreading importance of artificial intelligence and its tremendous consuming of computational resources, quantum speedup would be extremely attractive against the challenges from the Big Data…..
Read more at http://arxiv.org/pdf/1410.1054v1.pdf

Read also: First Demonstration Of Artificial Intelligence On A Quantum Computer

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What is dark energy?

Sure, the Universe is expanding, and that expansion is accelerating. But beyond simply calling the cause “dark energy,” what do we know about it?

“I must choose between despair and Energy —— I choose the latter.” -John Keats

All week long, some of you have been racking your brains to come up with the deepest, most mysterious questions about the Universe to highlight for our Ask Ethan column. We’ve gotten some outstanding questions and suggestions that you’ve sent in, and while it’s a pity I can only choose one, this week’s honor goes to Piyush Gupta, who asks:

[We] have found that dark energy makes up about 70% [of the] energy in the universe. We have evidence of dark energy from multiple observations. It has [a] real effect on the evolution of [the] observable universe. But what is dark energy? Do we have any idea? Do we have any good models for it?

As it turns out, we do have some good ideas, but let’s make sure we’re all on the same page first….

…. Read more at https://medium.com/starts-with-a-bang/ask-ethan-58-what-is-dark-energy-61db04945b3d

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Chronology of the Universe

What happened at the origin of the universe? How did the Big Bang process unfold? How was matter created? And what was the role of the Higgs boson, which gave mass to other particles? This is the story of the creation of our universe, a narrative that lasts 13.7 billion years, but we have summarized it for you in the three and a half minutes of this spectacular video illustration.

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A 3D Map of the Adolescent Universe

3D map of the cosmic web at a distance of 10.8 billion years from Earth, generated from imprints of hydrogen gas observed in the spectrum of 24 background galaxies behind the volume. This is the first time that large-scale structures in such a distant part of the Universe have been directly mapped. Credit: Casey Stark (UC Berkeley) and Khee-Gan Lee (MPIA). - See more at: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/2014/10/16/a-3d-map-of-the-adolescent-universe/#sthash.FC2wxF0N.dpuf

3D map of the cosmic web at a distance of 10.8 billion years from Earth, generated from imprints of hydrogen gas observed in the spectrum of 24 background galaxies behind the volume. This is the first time that large-scale structures in such a distant part of the Universe have been directly mapped. Credit: Casey Stark (UC Berkeley) and Khee-Gan Lee (MPIA).

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Read more at newscenter.lbl.gov